4175 N Hanson Ct, Ste #200, Bowie, MD 20716 301-383-9883

Immediate implant placement followed by temporary provisionalization can lead to great tissue contour which enhances the esthetics at the time of final restoration. At Bowie Oral Surgery we aim for excellent results every time. We achieve this by scheduling procedures in the required allotted time which allows us to focus on each surgery without distractions. We also believe in minimally invasive techniques which we utilize for each and every surgery, allowing for faster recovery and decreased pain/swelling. Try us out and experience the difference.

Oral Surgeon Bowie, MD

Here at Bowie oral surgery we offer a wide range of cosmetic facial procedures aimed at treating unsightly wrinkles, correcting the look of thin lips or thinning hair as well as repositioning of the chin to provide a stronger more esthetic appearing chin. All our facial cosmetic procedures are aimed at providing you with a more youthful, radiant appearance.

See the below list of cosmetic procedures and products we offer:

  • Botox
  • Juvederm
  • Voluma
  • RADIESSE
  • Kybella
  • Submental Liposuction
  • Lip Augmentation
  • Chin and Malar Implants
  • Genioplasty
  • Latisse
  • Skin Lesion Removal
  • Follicular unit hair transplant
  • Microneedling (vampire facials)

SINUS PRECAUTIONS AFTER ORAL SURGERY- Oral Surgeon Bowie, MD

PLEASE AVOID THE FOLLOWING:

  • Blowing your nose: Avoid nose blowing for 2 weeks. It is best to wipe away nasal secretions carefully. After 2 weeks, if you must blow your nose, blow gently through both sides at the same time. Do not pinch your nose: do not blow just one side at a time.
  • Sneezing: If you must sneeze, keep your mouth open and do not pinch your nose closed. Be careful and follow the recommended precautions while sneezing for at least 2 weeks.
  • Sucking: Do not drink through a straw. Do not smoke.
  • Blowing: Do not play a wind instrument. Do not blow up balloons.
  • Pushing or lifting: Do not lift or push objects weighing more than 20 pounds.
  • Bending over: Keep your head above the level of your heart. Sleep with your head slightly raised.

Slight bleeding from the nose is not uncommon for several days after surgery. Notify the doctor or the surgical assistant if you are unable to take any of your medication as prescribed.

It is likely that you may be advised to take an antibiotic and decongestant as well as your regular pain medication. You must take these medications as prescribed.

Do not stop taking them on your own. If you have a problem with any medication, please call us so that we can make an adjustment for you.

OTHER INSTRUCTIONS:

  • Over the counter decongestant may be taken.
  • Antibiotics may be taken as directed. REMEMBER: All forms of oral and administered contraception are to be considered unreliable while you are taking any form of antibiotic.
  • Afrin nasal spray may be used if prescribed for 3 days only, after this the nasal spray should be stopped.

Oral Surgeon Bowie, MD

After tooth extraction, it’s important for a blood clot to form to stop the bleeding and begin the healing process. Bite on a gauze pad for 30-45 minutes immediately after the appointment. If the bleeding or oozing still persists, place another gauze pad and bite firmly for another 30 minutes. You may have to do this several times to stop the bleeding.

After the blood clot forms it is important to not disturb or dislodge the clot. Do not rinse vigorously, suck on straws, smoke, drink alcohol or brush teeth next to the extraction site for 72 hours. These activities may dislodge or dissolve the clot and hinder the healing process. Limit vigorous exercise for the next 24 hours, as this increases blood pressure and may cause more bleeding and throbbing from the extraction site.

After the tooth is extracted you may feel some pain and experience some swelling. If provided an ice pack to the face may be recommended to help minimize swelling. Take pain medications as prescribed. The swelling usually subsides after 48 hours.

Use pain medication as directed. Call our office if the medication doesn’t seem to be working. If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time even if signs and symptoms of pain or infection are gone. Drink lots of fluids and eat nutritious, soft food on the day of the extraction. You can eat normally as soon as you are comfortable which is usually within 2-3 days. It is important that you avoid, brushing, rinsing or spitting the day of the extraction. You may resume brushing and gentle rinsing the following day as instructed by the doctor. A clean oral cavity decreases discomfort and improves healing.

After a few days you should feel fine and can resume your normal activities. If you have heavy bleeding, severe pain, continued swelling for 2-3 days, or a reaction to the medication, call our office immediately.

Oral Surgeon Bowie, MD

Do not disturb the wound. Avoid rinsing, spitting, or touching the wound on the day of surgery. There will usually be a metal healing abutment (post) protruding through the gums. Please take care to avoid heavy contact with he healing abutment (post) during eating as this may affect the healing of the implant underneath. It is not uncommon for the healing abutment (post) to become loose or fall out. If this happens please keep the healing abutment handy and call our office immediately.

SUTURES

Usually there will be sutures (stitches) placed to reapproximate the gingiva at the surgical sites. The sutures we place are usually resorbable and do not need to be removed. Please avoid tampering with the sutures, allow 7-10 days for sutures to dissolve. Occasionally sutures may break and fall out sooner than anticipated, this is not cause for alarm simply keep the area clean, healing typically progresses as normal.

BLEEDING

Some bleeding or redness in the saliva is normal for 24 hours. Excessive bleeding can be controlled by biting on a moistened gauze pad placed under pressure directly over the bleeding wound for 30 to 60 minutes. If bleeding continues profusely, please call for further instructions. Avoid the use of straws for 2-3 days after surgery.

SWELLING

Swelling is a normal occurrence after surgery. To minimize swelling apply an icepack, or towel filled with ice, on the face in the area of surgery. Apply the ice 20 mins on and 20 mins off at a time, as much as possible, for the first 24 hours.

DIET

Drink plenty of fluids. Avoid hot liquids or hard foods. Soft food and liquids should be eaten on the day of surgery and for 2-3 days. Return to a normal diet as soon as possible unless otherwise directed.

PAIN

  • You should begin taking pain medication as soon as possible prior to the local anesthetic wearing off which typically occurs 2-3 hrs after the procedure. For mild or moderate pain, one or two tablets of Tylenol or Extra Strength Tylenol may be taken every 3-4 hours not to exceed the max daily dose written on the bottle. Ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) may be taken instead of Tylenol. Ibuprofen bought over the counter comes in 200 mg tablets: up to 4 tablets may be taken at a time, four times daily, not to exceed the max daily dose written on the bottle. Consult our office for additional recommendations.
  • For severe pain, you may be prescribed stronger medications. These medications should be taken as directed. Do not take any medication if you are allergic to it or similar medicines, or have been instructed by your doctor not to take it. Do not drive an auto mobile or work around machinery and avoid alcoholic beverages while taking narcotic pain medications. Pain or discomfort following surgery should subside gradually. If pain persists, it may require attention and you should call our office.

ANTIBIOTICS

Antibiotics are usually necessary after implant surgery especially when bone graft material is used, if prescribed should be taken as directed to help prevent infection and subsequent implant failure.

ORAL HYGIENE

Good oral hygiene is essential to good healing. The night of surgery, use the prescribed Peridex Oral Rinse gently before bed. The day after surgery, the Peridex should be used twice daily; after breakfast and before bed. Be sure to rinse for at least 30 seconds then spit it out. Warm salt water rinses (one teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) should be used at least 3 times a day as well, especially after meals. Brush your teeth along with the healing abutments. Be gentle initially while brushing the surgical areas and be sure to use a soft bristle brush. If a bone graft material was used its normal to notice multiple small grains during rinsing or brushing, this should stop after 1-2 days.

ACTIVITY

Keep physical activities to a minimum immediately following surgery. If you exercise, throbbing or bleeding may occur. If this occurs, you should discontinue exercising. Keep in mind that you are probably not taking in normal nourishment. This may weaken you and further limit your ability to exercise.

WEARING YOUR PROSTHESIS

Partial dentures, flippers, or full dentures, should not be used immediately after surgery for at least 7 days, unless directed otherwise by the doctor.

SMOKING

Smoking not only disturbs and delays the normal wound healing but it also increases risk of excessive post-surgical bleeding as well as infection hence should be avoided for 3-4 days after surgery.

Oral Surgeon Bowie, MD

Here at Bowie oral surgery we offer a wide range of cosmetic facial procedures aimed at treating unsightly wrinkles, correcting the look of thin lips or thinning hair as well as repositioning of the chin to provide a stronger more esthetic appearing chin. All our facial cosmetic procedures are aimed at providing you with a more youthful, radiant appearance.

See the below list of cosmetic procedures and products we offer:

  • Botox
  • Juvederm
  • Voluma
  • RADIESSE
  • Kybella
  • Submental Liposuction
  • Lip Augmentation
  • Chin and Malar Implants
  • Genioplasty
  • Latisse
  • Skin Lesion Removal
  • Follicular unit hair transplant
  • Microneedling (vampire facials)

Oral Surgeon Bowie, MD

  • The use of 3D imaging in our office gives our practice state-of-the-art technology to help with diagnoses of potential issues more accurately and provide treatment with unprecedented confidence.
  • Unlike a traditional CT scanner, our scanner utilizes cone beam CT technology and provides precise, crystal-clear digital images while minimizing your radiation exposure. Our 3D system enables us to perform a wider range of diagnoses and treatments in our office, helping to reduce multiple visits.
  • Our new 3D scanner allow us to choose the field of view, or scanning area, that best suits your specific treatment needs. This helps to limit your radiation exposure because we are focusing specifically on your area of concern.
  • Dr. Egolum can use this innovative technology to quickly and easily share 3D images of the area of concern with your referring doctor – allowing the doctors to collaborate on your care, improving your experience and delivering a positive treatment outcome.

Oral Surgeon Bowie, MD

Do not disturb the wound. Avoid rinsing, spitting, or touching the wound on the day of surgery. There will usually be a metal or rubber chain protruding through the gums and attached to the arch wire of your braces. Please take care to avoid heavy contact with the chain during eating or brushing. It is not uncommon for the chain to become loose or detached from the tooth. If this happens please keep the chain and bracket handy and call our office immediately.

SUTURES

Usually there will be sutures (stitches) placed to reapproximate the gingiva at the surgical sites. The sutures we place are usually resorbable and do not need to be removed. Please avoid tampering with the sutures, allow 7-10 days for sutures to dissolve. Occasionally sutures may break and fall out sooner than anticipated, this is not cause for alarm simply keep the area clean, healing typically progresses as normal.

BLEEDING

Some bleeding or redness in the saliva is normal for 24 hours. Excessive bleeding can be controlled by biting on a moistened gauze pad placed under pressure directly over the bleeding wound for 30 to 60 minutes. If bleeding continues profusely, please call for further instructions. Avoid the use of straws for 2-3 days.

SWELLING

Swelling is a normal occurrence after surgery. To minimize swelling apply an icepack, or towel filled with ice, on the face in the area of surgery. Apply the ice 20 mins on and 20 mins off at a time, as much as possible, for the first 24 hours.

DIET

Drink plenty of fluids. Avoid hot liquids or hard foods. Soft food and liquids should be eaten on the day of surgery and for 2-3 days. Return to a normal diet as soon as possible unless otherwise directed.

PAIN

  • You should begin taking pain medication as soon as possible prior to the local anesthetic wearing off which typically occurs 2-3 hrs after the procedure. For mild or moderate pain, one or two tablets of Tylenol or Extra Strength Tylenol may be taken every 3-4 hours not to exceed the max daily dose written on the bottle. Ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) may be taken instead of Tylenol. Ibuprofen bought over the counter comes in 200 mg tablets: up to 4 tablets may be taken at a time, four times daily, not to exceed the max daily dose written on the bottle. Consult our office for additional recommendations.
  • For severe pain, you may be prescribed stronger medications. These medications should be taken as directed. Do not take any medication if you are allergic to it or similar medicines, or have been instructed by your doctor not to take it. Do not drive an automobile or work around machinery and avoid alcoholic beverages while taking narcotic pain medications. Pain or discomfort following surgery should subside gradually. If pain persists, it may require attention and you should call our office.

ANTIBIOTICS

Antibiotics are sometimes necessary after exposure of an impacted tooth, especially when bone is removed or the tooth is luxated (loosened). If prescribed, antibiotics should be taken as directed to help prevent infection.

ORAL HYGIENE

  • Good oral hygiene is essential to good healing especially since braces attract debris and bacteria. The night of surgery no rinsing or brushing should be done. The day after surgery, the prescribed oral rinse should be used twice daily; after breakfast and before bed. Be sure to rinse for at least 30 seconds then spit it out. Warm salt water rinses (one teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) should be used at least 3 times a day as well, especially after meals. Brush your teeth along with the braces well. Be gentle initially while brushing the surgical areas and be sure to use a soft bristle brush and avoid excessive contact to the protruding chain.

ACTIVITY

  • Keep physical activities to a minimum immediately following surgery. If you exercise, throbbing or bleeding may occur. If this occurs, you should discontinue exercising. Keep in mind that you are probably not taking in normal nourishment. This may weaken you and further limit your ability to exercise.

SMOKING

  • Smoking not only disturbs and delays the normal wound healing but it also increases risk of excessive post surgical bleeding as well as infection hence should be avoided for 3-4 days after surgery.

Oral Surgeon bowie, MD

ORAL SURGERY SEDATION | IV SEDATION

Several methods of anesthesia are available. The method of anesthesia that is chosen for or by a patient depends upon the nature of the surgical procedure and the patient’s level of apprehension.

To administer general anesthesia in the office, an oral surgeon must have completed at least five months of hospital based anesthesia training. Qualified applicants will then undergo an in office evaluation by a state dental board appointed examiner. The examiner inspects all monitoring devices and emergency equipment and tests the doctor and the surgical staff on anesthesia related emergencies. If the examiner reports successful completion of the evaluation process, the state dental board will issue the doctor a license to perform general anesthesia. The license is renewable every 5 years if the doctor maintains the required amount of continuing education hours related to anesthesia.

Again, when it comes to anesthesia, our first priority is the patient’s comfort and safety. If you have any concerns regarding the type of anesthesia that will be administered during your oral surgery procedure, please do not hesitate to discuss your concerns with your doctor at the time of your consultation.

ORAL SEDATION

Dr. Egolum is trained to administer (oral conscious) sedation, commonly referred to as “Sleep Dentistry.”

Sedation Dentistry Advantages to Patients

  • Treatment is completed when you are in a more relaxed mood.
  • You will have less difficulty sitting through a lengthy procedure.
  • Multiple treatments and full mouth restorations can occur at during the same visit.
  • Less discomfort after treatment.

Anti-Anxiety Pills

The most commonly prescribed dental related drugs that treat anxiety belong to the “benzodiazepine” family. Drugs such as Valium, Halcion, Xanax, or Ativan. These drugs decrease anxiety by binding and toning down activity within “fear” receptors in the brain.

INTRAVENOUS SEDATION (“TWILIGHT SEDATION”)

Our office offers our patients the option of Intravenous Sedation or Dental Intravenous Anesthesia or to some it is referred to as “Twilight Sedation” for their dental treatment. Intravenous Sedation or “twilight sleep” helps you to be comfortable and calm when undergoing dental procedures. Your treatment can be completed under intravenous sedation. Intravenous sedation or “IV sedation” (twilight sedation) is designed to better enable you to undergo your dental procedures while you are very relaxed; it will enable you to tolerate as well as not remember those procedures that may be very uncomfortable for you. IV sedation will essentially help alleviate the anxiety associated with your treatment. You may not always be asleep but you will be comfortable, calm and relaxed, drifting in and out of sleep – a “twilight sleep”.

If you choose the option of intravenous sedation your IV sedation/anesthesia is administered and monitored by the doctor therefore eliminating the costly expense of having your treatment carried out in an operating room or same day surgical facility.

HOW IS THE IV SEDATION ADMINISTERED?

A thin needle will be introduced into a vein in your arm or hand. The needle will be attached to an intravenous tube through which medication will be given to help you relax and feel comfortable. At times a patient’s vein may not be maintainable, in these situations the medications will be administered and the needle retrieved – both scenarios will achieve the same desired level of conscious sedation. Once again some patients may be asleep while others will slip in and out of sleep. Some patients with medical conditions and/or on specific drug regimens may only be lightly sedated and may not sleep at all.

The goal of IV sedation is to use as little medication as possible to get the treatment completed. It is very safe, much safer than oral sedation. With IV sedation a constant “drip” is maintained via the intravenous tube. At any time an antidote can be administered to reverse the effects of the medications if necessary. Along with IV sedation there are also other different “levels” of sedation available to you in our office. There is nitrous oxide analgesia.

NITROUS OXIDE (LAUGHING GAS)

Nitrous Oxide is a sweet smelling, non irritating, colorless gas which you can breathe. Nitrous Oxide has been the primary means of sedation in dentistry for many years. Nitrous oxide is safe; the patient receives 50-70% oxygen with no less than 30% nitrous oxide. Patients are able to breathe on their own and remain in control of all bodily functions. The patient may experience mild amnesia and may fall asleep not remembering all of what happened during their appointment.

There are many advantages to using Nitrous Oxide

  • The depth of sedation can be altered at any time to increase or decrease sedation.
  • There is no after effect such as a “hangover”.
  • Inhalation sedation is generally safe with no side effects on your heart and lungs, etc.
  • Inhalation sedation is very effective in minimizing gagging.
  • It works rapidly as it reaches the brain within 20 seconds. In as few as 2-3 minutes its relaxation and pain killing properties develop.

REASONS TO NOT USE NITROUS OXIDE

You should avoid using nitrous oxide if you are pregnant, have COPD, history of ear infection, emphysema, exotic chest problems, M.S., a cold or other difficulties with breathing. You may want to ask for a “5 minute trial” to see how you feel with this type of sedation method before proceeding.

Oral surgeon bowie, md

An impacted tooth simply means that it is “stuck” and cannot erupt into function. Patients frequently develop problems with impacted third molar (wisdom) teeth. These teeth get “stuck” in the back of the jaw and can develop painful infections among a host of other problems. Since there is rarely a functional need for wisdom teeth, they are usually extracted if they develop problems. The maxillary cuspid (upper eyetooth) is the second most common tooth to become impacted. The cuspid tooth is a critical tooth in the dental arch and plays an important role in your “bite”. The cuspid teeth are very strong biting teeth and have the longest roots of any human teeth. They are designed to be the first teeth that touch when your jaws close together so they guide the rest of the teeth into the proper bite.

Normally, the maxillary cuspid teeth are the last of the “front” teeth to erupt into place. They usually come into place around age 13 and cause any space left between the upper front teeth to close tighter together. If a cuspid tooth gets impacted, every effort is made to get it to erupt into its proper position in the dental arch. The techniques involved to aid eruption can be applied to any impacted tooth in the upper or lower jaw, but most commonly they are applied to the maxillary cuspid (upper eye) teeth. The impacted teeth are surgically exposed via an incision in the gums at which point the tooth is gently loosed and a bracket and chain attached to aid orthodontic eruption. Sixty percent of these impacted eyeteeth are located on the palatal (roof of the mouth) side of the dental arch. The remaining impacted eyeteeth are found in the middle of the supporting bone but stuck in an elevated position above the roots of the adjacent teeth or out to the facial side of the dental arch.

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